Saith Me… Thesis Lesson #2

I have begun to understand why young historians gravitate to the long dead rather than more recent history when undertaking historical research. While there may be less material easily discoverable, at least there is no ambiguity as to if the material is considered history. Trying to research more recent events, particularly the history of diplomacy and foreign policy, is fraught with the danger of leaving the realm of history and entering the realm of political science. And of course, there is the ever present frustration of feeling old because you lived through the “history” about which you are writing.

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